The Aware Concierge: February Edition

sunrise over sedona mountains

If you have stayed at L’Auberge de Sedona, then we are sure that you have spent time with our outstanding concierge team.  They are made up of the most “in-the-know” people in Sedona.  They know what is going on, where the best spots are, and they know people in all the right places.  So whether you are planning a girls-getaway consisting of spa treatments, yoga, art galleries, and great food, or if you’re a couple looking for an intimate spot to watch the sunset followed by a romantic meal, the concierge at L’Auberge is who you want to know!

 Hike of the Week | COURTHOUSE BUTTE LOOP

Courthouse Bell Rock Photo

To get to this wonderful trail, take the wide Bell Rock Pathway from the kiosk toward Bell Rock. It climbs gently and at ½ mile, there is a signed intersection with the Courthouse Butte Loop Trail. Continue ahead on the wide trail (this description is for taking the loop clockwise). The trail continues a gentle climb circling to the left of Bell Rock. It levels out at 1 mile and curves to the right below the slopes of Bell Rock. Follow the large cairns to the 1½ mile point where the wide Pathway turns north (left) and a sign shows the Courthouse Butte Loop Trail branching to the right. Go right. This narrower trail passes to the left of Courthouse Butte heading toward Lee Mountain. At 2¼ miles, the trail passes to the right of a prominent dome-shaped outcrop, and then gradually descends, entering Wilderness. It enters a dry wash at 3 miles, circles to the right over bare rock and climbs out onto level ground as it leaves the Wilderness area and continues to circle Courthouse Butte. Approaching Bell Rock, the trail meets the pathway once again at 3¾ miles. Go left, re-tracing the entry route for ½ mile to return to the kiosk.

Did You Know?

Sedona Schnebly’s birthday is celebrated in February.  Sedona‘s parents were Phillip and Amanda Miller. She married T. Carl Schnebly on her 20th birthday in Gorin, Missouri and they were the parents of 6 children. In 1901 they moved to the banks of Upper Oak Creek with 2 young children, Elsworth and Pearl. After 2 years of hard work, the Schnebly’s had opened the first store, the first hotel, which Sedona ran, the first truck farm and the first post office. Daughter Genevieve was born here. Carl applied for the first Post Office several names for the town but was rejected by the Post Master General in Washington D.C. Carl’s brother suggested they use the name Sedona and on June 26, 1902, the Postmaster approved it. At the age of 25, Sedona became the mother of the town and was very well liked throughout her life by the community. Life was hard for this pioneer woman. In 1905 daughter Pearl died in an accident which affected Sedona deeply. The family moved back to Gorin, Missouri, then to Colorado and finally returned to Sedona in 1931 during the height of the depression. They rented a one-room house, and Sedona at the age of 54 yrs. washed and ironed uniforms for the CCC. She was active in the American Union Sunday School, serving as secretary-treasurer. Her careful investments made it possible to build the Wayside Chapel and the Chapel Bell, which can be heard throughout the red rock canyons, is dedicated to her memory. Sedona died from cancer and was buried next to her daughter, Pearl 

Information found from Sedona Heritage Museum

Upcoming Events

3/1/19 – 3/3/19: Sedona Mountain Bike Festival
The Sedona MTB Festival is 3-day mountain bike celebration that will include a Main Expo/Festival, Bike Demos, Shuttled Rides, a Beer Garden, great Bands for (3) nights and a whole lotta sweet RED SINGLETRACK!

3/14/19 – 3/17/19: Sedona Yoga Festival
Deepen your practice and tap into ancient wisdom with three days of yoga, music and energy work in the undisputed spiritual center of the West. The flexible conference structure gives you an unparalleled opportunity to weave your own experience in the richly colored cultural and natural tapestry that is Sedona.

Check back for the next round of L’Auberge de Sedona concierge recommendations, as their roots run deep in the culture of Sedona.

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